A Reduction of Jus ad Bellum and in Bello to Hobbes’ First and Second Fundamental Laws of Nature Respectively

In this paper, I argue that jus ad bellum and jus in bello are reducible without remainder to Hobbes’ axiomatic first and second fundamental laws of nature respectively. Consequently, all principles of jus ad bellum and jus in bello are derived from these axioms. And so a cause of or act of war is unjust if it cannot be reduced to these axioms. …

Check out my new permanent page.

Check out my new permanent page eloquently entitled My papers ' n ' stuff. On this page I post some of my old papers and other works that I think worth a read. Feel free to download and play around with anything that interests you. My first entry is The Child-First Hypothesis of Language Acquisition…

The Real Experts.

Some people attempt to inject a little sense into the world by writing a letter to the editor, others by commenting on the comments commenting on the comments on a comment thread, and others still by preaching from a soapbox at a public discussion forum or from a soapbox on a street corner (location, location,…

New, old, permanence, and change: Heraclitus (everything is in motion) and Parmenides (nothing is in motion) in tension. A montage.

"Not everything was better in our ancestors' days, either -- our own age, too, has produced many instances of excellence and artistic merit deserving to be imitated by posterity. At all events, let us continue to promote such honourable competitiveness with our ancestors." Tacitus. The Annals: The Reigns of Tiberius, Claudius, and Nero. Oxford World's Classics.…